Posts Tagged ‘Tahnee Robinson’

1
Mar

UN-Reno basketball guard becomes star to campus, Native community

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University of Nevada’s women’s basketball player Tahnee Robinson signs autographs and posed for pictures for hundreds of fans following her game against New Mexico State University at Lawlor Events Center. (Tribune/John Byrne)

Tahnee Robinson (Shosone), a senior guard on the University of Nevada, Reno’s women’s basketball team, has made a name for herself on the court. She’s also helped her college and local Native communities come closer together.

Not only has she won several NCAA awards as a player, she often speaks with youth about her experiences. Last weekend, she stayed after the game and signed autographs.

Robinson was honored by the Native community in Reno last weekend, the Sparks Tribune reports, with an entire set of ceremonies during Reno’s game.

    Robinson . . . received a Pendleton blanket from the Pyramid Lake Veteran’s and Warriors Association in honor of her community service with local Native Americans.

    “It’s a tradition,” said Michelle McCauley, UNR intertribal higher education coordinator. “If someone is given one, then it means that they’ve done something very special. It’s a very high honor.”

    The ceremony was a part of a celebration of local Native Americans in conjunction with the Wolf Pack women’s game against the New Mexico State University Aggies.

    Finding camaraderie can be difficult for Native American students at UNR. There are only 173 self-identified Native American students out of 16,681 students at the school, according to McCauley.

Jenna Cederberg


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The University of Nevada-Reno women’s basketball team goes up against New Mexico State tonight in a game expected to be well-attended because of the extra festivities.

As Jim Krajewski of the Reno (Nev.) Gazette-Journal reports here, local tribes got flyers that allow each person with one to bring four other people to the game for free. And, he writes:

Tahnee Robinson

Tahnee Robinson

    Also, the Pyramid Lake Junior/Senior High School dance group will hold a pregame honor ceremony for Pack guard Tahnee Robinson. The drum group Red Hoop will sing and the Pyramid Lake High dance group and Numu Tookwaus color guard will join Robinson for the honor song and dance.

    “The idea is to honor Native Americans and do a Native American Awareness day. It was their idea to honor Tahnee,” [coach Jane] Albright said. “They feel like, for their culture, she’s kind of raised the bar on awareness.”

    Robinson is a Native American (Eastern Shoshone, Pawnee, Cheyenne and Sioux) from Lander, Wyo., on the edge of the Wind River reservation. She’s the Pack’s leading scorer at 15.4 points per game.

See Tetona Dunlap’s blog post about Robinson, here.

Gwen Florio

Wyoming Indian teammates Slade Spoonhunter, left, and Caleb Her Many Horses walk together after their second and first-place finishes, respectively, in the boys 2A class of the 2009 Wyoming State High School Cross Country Championships last October. (Dan Cepeda, Casper Star-Tribune)

Wyoming Indian teammates Slade Spoonhunter, left, and Caleb Her Many Horses walk together after their second and first-place finishes, respectively, in the boys 2A class of the 2009 Wyoming State High School Cross Country Championships last October. (Dan Cepeda, Casper Star-Tribune)


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Tetona Dunlap is a graduate student in journalism at the University of Montana. She is an enrolled member of the Eastern Shoshone tribe from the Wind River Indian Reservation in Wyoming.

Tetona Dunlap

Tetona Dunlap

One of the reasons why I came to graduate school at the University of Montana was to write stories concerning Native American issues. I must admit it is strange learning alongside my peers about issues and problems that I have learned to accept on some levels.

I have recently found myself consumed with the negative. It is disheartening to learn about all the problems facing Native country, even though I have been quite of aware of them for a while.

But after one class period of discussing issues of suicide, alcoholism, teenage pregnancy and drug abuse; I was for a moment uplifted after reading a story in my hometown’s newspaper about Caleb Her Many Horses, a senior at Wyoming Indian High School on the Wind River Reservation.

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BillyMillsKirstina BarkerTahneeRobinsonUNevada
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Tetona Dunlap is a graduate student in journalism at the University of Montana. She is an enrolled member of the Eastern Shoshone tribe from the Wind River Indian Reservation in Wyoming.

Tetona Dunlap

Tetona Dunlap

I remember the first time I met Billy Mills [above left, Rapid City Journal photo]. I was at the National Indian Gaming Association’s conference in San Diego. I was more excited and nervous to meet Mills than I was to meet actor Adam Beach. Beach, of course, had the most people lined up to meet him, mostly women, but for me, Mills signified a different honor.

Growing up on a reservation, sports culture is prevalent. However, I never knew about Mills until I was a senior in high school. I was writing an essay about Native Americans and came across an article online. Since I was a student-athlete at the time, I was excited to discover that a Native American from the Pine Ridge Reservation had won an Olympic gold medal.

Before that he was an All-American cross-country runner at the University of Kansas. The footage from the 1964 Olympic 10K race still gives me chills. It is still considered one of the greatest upsets in Olympic history and he is still the only American to ever win that race.

There is a great pride in the Native American community that follows those in sports. I am a fan of the Boston Red Sox because of Jacoby Ellsbury. I also follow New York Yankees pitcher Joba Chamberlain’s career, even though I am not a fan of the Yankees. Ellsbury and Chamberlain are two of only three active Native American players in Major League Baseball.

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