Posts Tagged ‘Frybread’

David Bender's Nearly Paleo Rubbed Ribs (Courtesy of ICTMN)


Paleo Super Bowl snacks — The caveman game plan
See if you can wait until this afternoon to start whipping up some of the goodies suggested by ICTMN contributer David Bender.

In a story on ICTMN this week, Bender describes how to make a Paleo warrior, caveman style feast for the big game.

    That means we’re going commando—no bread, no buns and no sugar.

    So with that I give you something we all crave: food you can eat with your hands! That’s right football fans, sans fork and spoon.

    Now, what would a Super Bowl party be without chips and appetizers? In this article I have suggestions for snacks (sweet potato chip), appetizers (paleo patties), a condiment (guacamole) and an entree (ribs).

Bender’s post includes a shopping list and recipes. OK, it’s time to get to the kitchen . . .

Funny film gives a unique look at frybread
This week’s second brunch tidbit also involves work in the kitchen.

Have a look at this “frybread “mockumentary” piece featured on Azfamily.com. Stacey Delikat takes us through a synopsis of the funny film.

    “More than Frybread” is the brainchild of Mesa filmmaker Travis Holt Hamilton.

    The movie follows members of twenty-different Native American tribes as they seek to compete in the made-up “Worldwide Fry Bread Association” competition in Flagstaff.

    Courtesy of AZFamily.com.


    Hamilton, who has made four other films about Native Americans, says he got the idea for the mockumentary after spending time living on a reservation as a missionary.

    “Numerous people have made frybread, everyone claiming their bread is the best,” he explained. “So we thought, let’s kind of play that up and have a competition that these tribes are competing for the championship title.”

To learn more about the film visit Frybreadmovie.com.

Jenna Cederberg

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Helen Moore, 70, shapes dough for fry bread at Flowing Water Navajo Casino on Nov. 10, in Hogback, N.M. (The Daily Times, Rebecca Craig, Associated Press)

Helen Moore, 70, shapes dough for fry bread at Flowing Water Navajo Casino on Nov. 10, in Hogback, N.M. (The Daily Times, Rebecca Craig, Associated Press)


Before she was dubbed “Champion Fry Bread Maker” at the Flowing Water Navajo Casino in New Mexico, Helen Moore, 70, was a postal worker, a teacher and worked from the Bureau of Indian Education. She was a bilingual teacher and worked seasonally at an agricultural products business.

Now her days are spent carefully crafting the traditional favorite in the most authentic of ways, as the Deseret News reports. She is one of two chefs that are on full-time fry bread duty at the new casino.

Moore learned the craft as a child and now will help Flowing Waters fill its more than 400 orders for the treat each day. She can measure the recipe by sight and knows just how well the fry bread goes with mutton stew, another favorite at the casino. It’s something she made for her sister and brothers, then taught her children the recipe so they could keep the tradition alive.

Moore holds this process close to her heart.

    The process of making fry bread is deeper than clocking in for work every morning, however, Moore said.

    “A lot of it is your mood,” she said while stretching a ball of dough in preparation of dropping it into the deep fryer. “If you’re angry or upset, the dough will not cooperate. If you come to work frustrated, the dough won’t come out good. It’s best if you’re in a good mood. The dough will be soft.”

    Though working hand-in-hand to produce jobs and revenue in Hogback, casinos and fry bread share an unappetizing history.

    The Navajo people began making fry bread when they were forced off their sacred land in the Four Corners in 1863 and were rationed government supplies of flour, salt, baking powder, lard and water.

Jenna Cederberg

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Here’s the whole story from the Rapid City Journal:

Fry bread is favored by many tribes. In this 2005 photo, Zelda Chaplin, a cook at the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center, takes out a piece of frybread during the lunch hour. (Arizona Daily Star photo)

Frybread is favored by many tribes. In this 2005 photo, Zelda Chaplin, a cook at the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center in Albuquerque, N.M., takes out a piece of frybread during the lunch hour. (Arizona Daily Star photo)

South Dakota’s official bread has been put in the crosshairs of a national health magazine.

“Health” magazine on Tuesday named frybread as one of the 50 fattiest foods in the United States as part of a story identifying at least one less-than-healthy food item from each state.

In identifying frybread as South Dakota’s contribution to the food wall of shame, it said the the traditional Native American dish has about 25 grams of fat. Frybread was named South Dakota’s official state bread in 2005.

Many of the state’s neighbors got off more lightly — both figuratively and literally — with the magazine’s selections.

North Dakota was recognized for its Fleischkuechle, a meat patty smothered in a fried dough wrapping that has about 19 grams of fat. Meanwhile, Nebraska was noted as birthplace of the Eskimo pie (13 grams of fat), Montana for Rocky Mountain oysters (5 grams of fat per “oyster”) and Wyoming for the relatively lean lamb chops (about 12 grams of fat per chop).

Only Minnesota topped South Dakota, being recognized as headquarters for Dairy Queen and that chain’s FlameThrower GrillBurger, which has a whopping 75 grams of fat per burger.

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