map

The map above is titled “Sleeping on the Couch,” and that says it all.

It’s part of a recent report by the Conference Board of Canada on housing overcrowding in Canada’s North.

“Almost all social and health problems increase dramatically when combined with overcrowded housing,” Gilles Rhéaume, the conference board’s vice-president for public policy, tells Nunatsiaq News. “Crowded housing is an issue that clearly demonstrates a north-south divide in Canada.”

According to the report:

    In Statistics Canada’s Keewatin census division, which covers the Kivalliq region in Nunavut, 25 per cent of homes have six or more people living in them— the highest percentage of overcrowding in Canada.

    Close behind are regions in five provinces which also have census divisions showing that 10 per cent or more of the homes are overcrowded.

    These census divisions are:

    * Northern Manitoba (Division No. 23 Churchill) – 20 per cent
    * Northern Saskatchewan (Division No. 18, including La Ronge) – 18 per cent
    * Northern Newfoundland and Labrador (Division No. 11 Nunatsiavut area) – 14 per cent
    * Northern Quebec (Nunavik) – 14 per cent
    * Northwestern Alberta (Division No. 17) – 10 per cent

“Sleeping on the Couch” is the fifth map in a series from the Conference Board of Canada’s Centre for the North.

Gwen Florio

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This entry was posted on Tuesday, September 28th, 2010 at 8:01 am and is filed under First Nations, Inuit, Native housing. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

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