Archive for August 14th, 2011

14
Aug

Sunday Brunch: Bridging generations and uncovering a burial ground

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A high-rise steel teepee landmark for present and future generations to cross over stands tall on the west side of Highway 93. The bridge was open to the public last month. (Lailani Upham photo)


Bridge to connect communities, pave way for future generations
The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes celebrated the opening of a 265-foot long footbridge connecting its tribal complex to Salish Kootenai College last month, Char-Koosta News reports.

The bridge is anchored on both sides by teepees ramps that tower over the highway running through the town of Pablo.

Planning for the $3.2 million project, which was partially funded by stimulus funds, began in 2009.

    CSKT Tribal Health Director and Montana Transportation Commission Chairman Kevin Howlett said the structure connects the community to the future. “Building this represents generations to follow us into the future,” Howlett addressed those in attendance.

More Native American remains found in Oak Harbor; count rises to 11
Workers recovered more Native remains at a work site near Coupeville, Wash., the Whidbey News-Times reports, convincing experts working at the site that the space now occupied by a mini-mart must have once been a burial ground used by tribes in the area.

Eleven sets of remains have now been found under a section of land there and experts expect more will be revealed as the investigations into the remains’ origin continues. The findings have halted a road project, as state officials continue to investigate the remains.

    (The state’s) physical anthropologist has completed only about two-thirds of his analysis so it’s very possible the remains of more people could be identified. She could not say whether this will further delay the project.

    However, Project Manager Larry Cort said today that the recent discoveries will warrant another meeting between the state office, the city, and the six affected tribes.

    The discussion will focus mainly on what to do with the remains. They could be left where they are or removed and reburied with the bones of the four others discovered in June, Cort said.

Jenna Cederberg