Archive for the ‘Geronimo’ Category

ICTMN posted this video by the 1491, an Indian sketch comedy group that hoped to prove Germonino was not killed in Pakistan, but instead, is living strong.

    . . . This poetic video written and directed by Ryan Red Corn and Dallas Goldtooth and recited by Casie Camp, Brooke Cunningham, Brittany Cunningham, Mason Cunningham, Dallas Goldtooth, Danon Hare, Mark Hendricks, Aunyeyapiwin Mahpiya Maza, Sedelta Oosahwee, Alex Red Corn, Electa Red Corn, Ryan Red Corn and Tito Ybarra.

Jenna Cederberg

Courtesy of ICTMN

The voices of Indian Country were clear this week: Geronimo is no code name. Get to know the warrior through this stunning set of photos presented by ICTMN.

The use of ‘Geronimo’ as Osama bin Laden’s code name in the raid that killed the terrorist leader Sunday will be discussed during a Senate Indian Affairs Committee hearing today on Capitol Hill.

The government has yet to comment on the story but staffers for the committee have said the use of the revered Native warrior’s name was ‘inappropriate,” the Associated Press reports.

NCAI president Jefferson Keel released a statement yesterday, saying the association of the two names needed to be addressed by that “Osama bin Laden was a shared enemy.” Read his entire statement at Indianz.com.

Senate official: Wrong to link bin Laden, Geronimo

    By MATTHEW DALY, of the Associated Press:

    WASHINGTON – The top staffer for the Senate Indian Affairs Committee is objecting to the U.S. military’s use of the code name “Geronimo” for Osama bin Laden during the raid that killed the al-Qaida leader.

    Geronimo was an Apache leader in the 19th century who spent many years fighting the Mexican and U.S. armies until his surrender in 1886.

    Loretta Tuell, staff director and chief counsel for the Senate Indian Affairs Committee, said Tuesday it was inappropriate to link Geronimo, whom she called “one of the greatest Native American heroes,” with one of the most hated enemies of the United States.

    Read the rest of this entry »

Geronimo (Courtesy of Channel 4 News)


It’s been reported today that the code name given to Osama bin Laden during American’s 10 year hunt for the now-dead leader of al Qaeda was Geronimo.

Pictures of the revered Native fighter who defied American troops for decades during the 1800s during colonization are popping up everything next to the face of bin Laden. The reason for the name hasn’t been given by the military or government, but a lot of articles showing up today are asking, why?

Here’s the analysis from Time:

    In the situation room Sunday, President Obama waited to hear if Geronimo was dead. Then word came. “We’ve IDed Geronimo,” said a voice. He was dead. He was also Osama bin Laden. So why nickname the operation to kill America’s most-hated terrorist with the name of a famous Native American freedom fighter? Good question.

    Born with the name Goyahkla (meaning He Who Yawns), the 19th century Apache hero was eventually dubbed Geronimo by Mexican soldiers. (Geronimo declared himself an enemy of the country after the murder of his family by Mexican forces, which explains why the two were at odds.)

Channel 4 The Programme, is an independent, nightly British news cast with a strong presence online. Here’s its take on the Geronimo name:

    Geronimo famously said he was not a chief, a political leader. Instead, like Bin Laden, he saw himself as a military leader.

    Bin Laden’s fundamental hatred against the west was supposedly the US presence on holy (and oil-rich) Saudi Arab soil. In the 1860s, the discovery of Gold in the West saw the US and the Mexican governments speed up their push against American Indians to seize their land.

    Geronimo became a great war leader, a symbol of resistance to the white occupation. His small band of warriors raided settlements in Arizona, and attacked US troops.

Finally, the column about the story from CBS news:

    Like bin Laden, Geronimo proved to be an elusive target. More than 5,000 soldiers were deployed to capture him in around 1885.

    Geronimo was fighting for his land, and committed what U.S officials at the time might have called acts of terrorism, conducting raids on white settlers in Apache territory. U.S. officials said they could convict Geronimo and his fighters of murder, and exiled the outlaw Apache to Florida as a prisoner of war, never to return to his homeland.

    But bin Laden was in a completely different league. The al Qaeda leader was a mass murderer, out to destroy Western civilization, not primarily to protect his lands.

Jenna Cederberg

This April 22, 2009 file photo shows Geronimo's grave in the Apache cemetery at Fort Sill in Lawton, Okla. A federal judge has dismissed a lawsuit by descendants of the Apache warrior Geronimo, who claimed some of his remains were stolen in 1918 by Skull and Bones. (AP Photo/File)

This April 22, 2009 file photo shows Geronimo's grave in the Apache cemetery at Fort Sill in Lawton, Okla. A federal judge has dismissed a lawsuit by descendants of the Apache warrior Geronimo, who claimed some of his remains were stolen in 1918 by Skull and Bones. (AP Photo/File)

This just in from the Associated Press:

Geronimo

Geronimo

NEW HAVEN, Conn. (AP) — A federal judge has dismissed a lawsuit by descendants of the Apache warrior Geronimo, who claimed some of his remains were stolen in 1918 by a student society at Yale University.

The lawsuit was filed last year in Washington by 20 descendants who want to rebury Geronimo near his New Mexico birthplace.

It claimed Skull and Bones members took some remains from a burial plot at Fort Sill, Okla., where Geronimo died in 1909.

Judge Richard Roberts last month granted a Justice Department motion to dismiss, saying the plaintiffs didn’t establish the government had waived its right not to be sued without its consent.

He also dismissed the lawsuit against Yale and the society, saying the plaintiffs cited a law that applies only to Native American cultural items excavated or discovered after 1990.

Skull and Bones is not officially affiliated with Yale.

Click here to read the Yale Daily report.